Sign Language

Sign Language

Grade 4
new in 1996

1.    Learn the manual alphabet used by the deaf, and the rules pertaining to it.
2.    Learn how to send the receive words, using the manual alphabet.
3.    Learn at least 50 words.
4.    Learn and present at least one simple Christian song.
5.    Where possible, have the Adventurers meet a deaf person and sign with them.
6.    Sign a simple Bible verse.

Helps
1.    As available (from your local Association of the Deaf), use the two-sided manual alphabet cards. That way the children can see what the signs look like from both the sender’s and receiver’s angle.
2.    First they can have fun learning to spell their names. Print words on a sheet of paper, and then have the children take turns spelling and receiving the words. Have children get in groups of two and send and receive words of their choice.
3.    Words young people really like to learn are the animals and foods. The book Joy of Signing is a good book to learn these signs, as well as the other signs. It gives both a word and a picture description of each sign. It also tells the sign’s origin (example: Jesus—origin: indicating the nail prints).
4.    Jesus Loves Me and Into My Heart are two examples. Remember to explain the origins when needed.
5.    Have someone from your deaf community come in and share a bit of their life with the children, and teach them a few words. This will really bring this award to life.

Resources
•    The local chapter of the National Association of the Deaf.
•    Christian Record Services International, Inc., P.O. Box 6097, Lincoln, Nebraska 68506. Phone: (402) 488-0981.
•    National Association of the Deaf, 814 Thayer Avenue, Silver Spring, Maryland 20190
•    The book Joy of Signing (by Lottie Riekshof) is available at most book stores.